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Posts tagged ‘catholic’

The David Initiative

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Elizabeth Scalia at Aleteia.org reports o the David Initiative, an effort to make liturgical music as powerful as it deserves to be.

“We celebrate David for his courage as a warrior and his strength as a King, but we should never forget that before that he was a singer, a composer. The songs that David wrote were beautiful; they were passionate. They were powerful; they were moving.”

They are currently sponsoring a competition for original music with a grand prize that will appeal to musicians everywhere.

Read more:

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

10 Beautiful New Churches

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The tide is beginning to turn. After decades of church architecture that is at best liturgically questionable, more and more architects are returning to traditional forms for the newest churches.

The Christian Review has a run-up of ten that are currently in various stages of construction, Enjoy!

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

The Third Issue of Altar Dei is Out

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We have just passed the 50th anniversary  of the release of De Musica Sacra, the document on sacred music by Pope Pius XII.

The most recent issue of Altar Dei features articles commemorating the anniversary of this wonderful instruction on sacred music from the Holy Father. The journal includes articles on sacred art, liturgy, and culture as well as sheet music.

You can purchase the third issue here: (you can also purchase issues #1 and #2)

_________________________________________________________________Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

 

Pope Francis on Sacred Music

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Aleteia.org has the English translation of Pope Francis’ recent address to participants in a conference on sacred music.

“At times, a certain mediocrity, superficiality and banality have prevailed to the detriment of the beauty and intensity of the liturgical celebrations. That is why the various actors in this field, musicians and composers, conductors and singers in scholae cantorum, and those involved in the liturgy, can make a valuable contribution to the renewal —especially in quality of sacred music …”

Read more here:

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

 

The Catholic Artists Society Archives

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“The Art of the Beautiful” is a lecture series sponsored by The Catholic Artists Society in New York City. The series is designed to explore how the Catholic faith informs the arts.

For those if us who do not live in the area and cannot attend the lectures, the society has made the most recent lectures available in their archives. These include:

“The Sacred Liturgy as a Primary Source for Artist’s Imagination” by Jenifer Donelson

“Art and Transformation” by James Patrick Reid

“Image and Likeness” by Anthony Visco

Take a look here.

While you’re there be sure to browse through their archives where they have material dating back to 2011.

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

Christian Art Gallery Opens in Toronto

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“Miracles happen here.”

Aidan Lefebvre offers display space for Christian artists, free of charge.

Read the story from Brantnews

_________________________________________________________________Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

Caravaggio Saves the World

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Dostoyevsky famously wrote: “Beauty will save the world.”

In the 17th century, in the throes of reformation and counter-reformation, the world was very much in need of saving and beauty can to the rescue.

Elizabeth Lew at Aletia, gives us the story.

“Enter the painters. Brandishing brushes, flanked by theologians and girded with personal faith, artists worked to ignite the imagination and deepen adoration for the Eucharist in their empirical times.”

Read more:

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

The Creative Catholic: Joseph Pierce

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The Catholic World Report has an interview with author Joseph Pierce by K.V. Truly

“I’d prefer to speak of what writing is teaching me rather than what it has taught. I feel as though my relationship with the Muse is like my relationship with God, which is hardly surprising considering that the Muse is God-given. I am, therefore, always learning more about myself and my place in the scheme of things from my relationship with the Muse. It’s a teacher, to be sure, but the lessons it teaches always open out into deeper and richer lessons. As Lewis says in The Last Battle we are always called to be going Further Up and Further In.”

Read more

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university

Knights of Columbus Sponsors Spectacular New High Cross in Our Lady of Mountains, Georgia

by Daniel Mckeon

The narthex of Our Lady of the Mountains Parish in Jasper, Georgia will soon be adorned with a High Celtic cross sponsored by Knights of Columbus Council 14348. Carved and crafted by former parishioner and Knights of Columbus member John Roger, nearly twelve foot high cross will be placed above the doors entering the nave of the church. The cross exhibits the beautiful detailing unique and endearing to Celtic art, featuring woven patterns and bearing the images of four Celtic saints. “High Crosses like these were carved by missionaries of old who went forth from places like the Holy Island of Iona to preach the Gospel in what some have called the Dark Ages,” Pastor Father Charles Byrd explains. The four Irish saints to be immortalized on the four corners of the cross are Saint Finnian of Clonard, Saint Columba of Iona, Saint Aiden of Lindisfarne, and Saint Dallan Forgaill. However obscure they may seem, the extant information about these saints is testimony to their apostolic zeal and their valorous love of Christ.

Doug and John Installing the HIgh Cross

The bas-relief on the base of the cross will be that of Saint Finnian. Born in 470 A.D. in County Carlow, Finnian was educated in Gaul and went on to found several churches and abbeys. Most notable among these was the Abbey at Clonard in County Mealth. Here, Finnian earned a reputation for his wisdom and holiness. This reputation inspired thousands across Europe to come and learn from the wise and holy Saint of Clonard. One of Finnian’s students was Saint Columba, the saint whose image graces the crest of the cross.

Columba’s name in Gaelic means “Church Dove.” As such, he is depicted with a dove in the bas-relief, the traditional symbol for the Holy Spirit, which he brought bravely through out the British Isles and, via his pupils, Europe and the world. A descendant of kings, Columba was born in 521 in County Donagal. He joined the monastery and studied under Finnian, becoming a tireless scribe, transcribing over 300 books. In 563, Saint Columba travelled with twelve companions in a wooden frame boat of wicker and leather to the island Iona, located near Scotland. On Iona, he established an abbey that become famous through out the world for its holiness and instruction.

On the right arm of the cross is the image of Saint Aidan of Lindisfarne. Like Finnian and Columba, Aidan was born in Ireland around 590 A.D. Early in his life he became a monk, entering the abbey on Iona. When Prince Oswald of Northumbria became king, he invited missionaries from the renowned Iona abbey to evangelize his kingdom. Previously, Oswald had studied with the monks at Iona while in exile. Aidan was among the missionaries requested by Oswald. Through out his life, Aidan founded many monasteries, churches, and schools, all of which became centers for learning and charity. Saint Aidan was known for taking in orphans and educating them. He was also known to pay the ransom to liberate slaves, who would later be ordained as priests. Aidan’s efforts endure today in the mission of the Knights of Columbus, to assist orphans and those in need, and the Knights’ incessant efforts to support the essential vocation of the priesthood. Aidan is depicted on the cross with a “flame,” the Gaelic meaning of his name. But the flame, of course, is more than an allusion to the saint’s Gaelic roots; in Christian symbolism, the flame represents the light of Christ, which Aidan brought through his works to the people of the British Isles, and illuminated the shadowy corridors of the so-called Dark Ages.

Like the sublime beauty of the Mass, the High Cross finishes with a hymn. The final image is that of poet and bard Saint Dallan Forgail, famous for his poem, “Be Thou my Vision,” which provides the words for one of the Church’s most enduring hymns. Descended from a high king of Ireland, Dallan was born in 530 A.D into a family of poets and saints. He was known for his holiness and verse. Dallan was eventually recognized as Chief Ollan of Ireland, a position described as a combination of poet laureate and minister of education. As Ollan (which means “most great”), it was Dallan’s responsibility to tell the tales of old, likely harkening back to the pagan days. But tragedy struck the saint in 598, when Dallan was beheaded by pirates raiding his island monastery of Inneskeel. His demise was now the subject of tales told by the bards that survived, similar to the ones he once told. Dallan was blind, which some say was the result of reading too many books. In fact, his name in Gaelic means, “Little Blind One.” His image on the cross depicts him as such.

Writer Thomas Cahill once quipped that Saint Patrick’s greatest gift to Ireland was the gift of Christianity, a gift we have seen multiplied a hundredfold over the centuries and particularly in these four Irish saints. Once installed, the High Cross will be a reminder of the example of these four saints and the sacrifices they made to sow the seeds of Christ’s love through out the world and across the ages. The cross is also a reminder that, at a time when the number of Christians being persecuted is growing incrementally and our Faith is increasingly under attack, Christ is our Light illuminating our way through these morally dark times, through this culture of death. It is a reminder in these times to “Be not afraid” and know, as Saint Dallan reminds the faithful of the world, that what e’er befall Christ must still be our vision.

High Cross in the narthex with light less bright

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Pontifex University is an online university offering a Master’s Degree in Sacred Arts. For more information visit the website at www.pontifex.university